Roderick Sloan.     Curator of ArktiskMat 2018, Aquaculture    Sea urchins are abundant throughout the Mediterranean to this day, and prized in kitchens from Sardinia to the Bodrum peninsula. In Japan,  uni  are considered one of the greatest delicacies. All those spines are, it seems, protecting something very special: inside, once you have inserted a pair of scissors into the unfortunate creature’s orifice and snipped a hole around the top of its prickly carapace – boiled egg style – you will find five golden-orange “tongues”, in fact the gonads. Best eaten raw, they taste as if mermaids made vanilla ice cream. Sloan harvests his sea urchin beds on a five-year rotation, and only ever by hand. The best examples grow on exposed rocks in rougher seas. They like the aeration apparently, but this is also the most dangerous place to dive. “On a ‘washing machine’ day a big wave can push you upside-down into the rocks and you can end up not being able to see your oxygen bubbles,” he says. “I’ve had white-outs where I have floated for five minutes not knowing where I was. “You know, I spend every day with them,” he says. “I have bits of their spines embedded in various parts of my body. I came here to make money from them years ago, but then I fell in love.”

Roderick Sloan.

Curator of ArktiskMat 2018, Aquaculture

Sea urchins are abundant throughout the Mediterranean to this day, and prized in kitchens from Sardinia to the Bodrum peninsula. In Japan, uni are considered one of the greatest delicacies. All those spines are, it seems, protecting something very special: inside, once you have inserted a pair of scissors into the unfortunate creature’s orifice and snipped a hole around the top of its prickly carapace – boiled egg style – you will find five golden-orange “tongues”, in fact the gonads. Best eaten raw, they taste as if mermaids made vanilla ice cream. Sloan harvests his sea urchin beds on a five-year rotation, and only ever by hand. The best examples grow on exposed rocks in rougher seas. They like the aeration apparently, but this is also the most dangerous place to dive. “On a ‘washing machine’ day a big wave can push you upside-down into the rocks and you can end up not being able to see your oxygen bubbles,” he says. “I’ve had white-outs where I have floated for five minutes not knowing where I was.
“You know, I spend every day with them,” he says. “I have bits of their spines embedded in various parts of my body. I came here to make money from them years ago, but then I fell in love.”

  Bjørn Olvik  is the sales director at Nova Sea, one of the largest producers of atlantic farmed salmon in Northern Norway. The first farmed salmon that came to northern Norway was packed in plastic bags, aboard a seaplane landed on Lovund. This happened in June 1972, and in the early years the downturns were many. For example, only 174 of the first exposed 1,200 salmon survived! The scientists were skeptical about salmon farming in Northern Norway, but entrepreneur and driver Steinar Olaisen believed in the project, and with his immediate colleagues he worked at times around the clock with countless experiments and attempts.  His motivation was, first of all, to reverse the negative population development at home, and to help the local business community as opposed. For at the same time fish farming was laid down, and there was little optimism on Lovund. But, now we see the facet of many years of hard work: Optimism is flourishing more than ever!

Bjørn Olvik is the sales director at Nova Sea, one of the largest producers of atlantic farmed salmon in Northern Norway. The first farmed salmon that came to northern Norway was packed in plastic bags, aboard a seaplane landed on Lovund. This happened in June 1972, and in the early years the downturns were many. For example, only 174 of the first exposed 1,200 salmon survived! The scientists were skeptical about salmon farming in Northern Norway, but entrepreneur and driver Steinar Olaisen believed in the project, and with his immediate colleagues he worked at times around the clock with countless experiments and attempts.

His motivation was, first of all, to reverse the negative population development at home, and to help the local business community as opposed. For at the same time fish farming was laid down, and there was little optimism on Lovund. But, now we see the facet of many years of hard work: Optimism is flourishing more than ever!

  Joshua Evans  is a doctoral researcher in Geography and the Environment at Oxford. He studies contemporary fermentation practices in Copenhagen: how combining far-flung techniques with regional ingredients to produce flavours that have never existed before is giving rise to new human–microbe relationships, and possibly even new microbes themselves. He is conducting experiments with the Noma Fermentation Lab, Empirical Spirits, and the Danish Natural History Museum, building on four years of work at Nordic Food Lab, a non-profit organisation in Copenhagen for open-source experimental research on taste and food diversity, such as with insects, wild plants, and fermentation techniques. He holds an MPhil in History and Philosophy of Science from Cambridge, where he researched how historical field sciences, colonialism, and past agricultures have shaped contemporary conservation practices, and a BA in the Humanities at Yale where he studied literature, philosophy, and sustainable food systems.  His research is about how humans and nonhumans shape each other in food and agricultural systems past and present; at ArktiskMat he will explore how these questions pertain to aquacultures.

Joshua Evans is a doctoral researcher in Geography and the Environment at Oxford. He studies contemporary fermentation practices in Copenhagen: how combining far-flung techniques with regional ingredients to produce flavours that have never existed before is giving rise to new human–microbe relationships, and possibly even new microbes themselves. He is conducting experiments with the Noma Fermentation Lab, Empirical Spirits, and the Danish Natural History Museum, building on four years of work at Nordic Food Lab, a non-profit organisation in Copenhagen for open-source experimental research on taste and food diversity, such as with insects, wild plants, and fermentation techniques. He holds an MPhil in History and Philosophy of Science from Cambridge, where he researched how historical field sciences, colonialism, and past agricultures have shaped contemporary conservation practices, and a BA in the Humanities at Yale where he studied literature, philosophy, and sustainable food systems.

His research is about how humans and nonhumans shape each other in food and agricultural systems past and present; at ArktiskMat he will explore how these questions pertain to aquacultures.

 Eighteen years ago,  Craig Grozier  arrived in Edinburgh from his hometown in the Highlands to begin his kitchen career. This would lead to a classical training in the fundamentals of French cuisine in some of the best kitchens in the city.  Seeking to broaden the horizons of his culinary knowledge, Craig travelled to immerse himself the food cultures of countries from Peru to Japan and found work in respected kitchens in Australia, Italy and Spain. Home and abroad, he has worked under mentors who have held Michelin stars and ran five starred establishments.    Since founding Fallachan, Craig has continually sought to challenge himself by staging in restaurants such as L’Enclume, Hibiscus, Tom Aikens and The Ledbury. Drawing from these worldwide culinary experiences, Craig has refined his technique to create his own style and philosophy of cooking – local, seasonal, wild and progressive.

Eighteen years ago, Craig Grozier arrived in Edinburgh from his hometown in the Highlands to begin his kitchen career. This would lead to a classical training in the fundamentals of French cuisine in some of the best kitchens in the city.

Seeking to broaden the horizons of his culinary knowledge, Craig travelled to immerse himself the food cultures of countries from Peru to Japan and found work in respected kitchens in Australia, Italy and Spain. Home and abroad, he has worked under mentors who have held Michelin stars and ran five starred establishments.

Since founding Fallachan, Craig has continually sought to challenge himself by staging in restaurants such as L’Enclume, Hibiscus, Tom Aikens and The Ledbury. Drawing from these worldwide culinary experiences, Craig has refined his technique to create his own style and philosophy of cooking – local, seasonal, wild and progressive.

  Anna Karlsdóttir  is a human geographer and holds a PhD in social Sciences from Roskilde University, Denmark. She has been assistant professor at human geography and tourism studies at University of Iceland since 2002. She is currently Senior Research fellow at Nordregio and has coordinated the Nordic Arctic Working Group (2013-2016), and now The Nordic Thematic Group on sustainable rural development (2018-2021).    Anna loves food and has written about changes in agriculture of the North and Fisheries towards a new regime that builds on rediscovering and reinventing traditions combined with innovations and in some cases combining primary production activities with tourism development. The coastal and inland areas of Arctic Norden are under transition. Food tourism in peripheral regions differs from more central locations in the sense that tourism demand and tourism  industry support for northern cuisine is relatively new. In the Arctic as in other peripheral regions, there is a trend in the tourism industry to provide local experiences through food for visitors to Arctic regions.  Transition entails for many of or the rural areas that they will to large extent still be based on food production such as livestock farming, fishing, aquaculture and other means of making a living from harvesting and producing, processing and presenting edible products combined with emerging service economies and creative industries. Sustainable living in the North in years to come will be based on innovations and a spirit to extract more ecologically sound products, New ways of developing the bio-economy of the North.  Anna has been member of slowfood since 2006 as an activist and in Terra-Madre events in Iceland. Her hobbies at home include permaculture gardening and culturing edible flowers and vegetables.

Anna Karlsdóttir is a human geographer and holds a PhD in social Sciences from Roskilde University, Denmark. She has been assistant professor at human geography and tourism studies at University of Iceland since 2002. She is currently Senior Research fellow at Nordregio and has coordinated the Nordic Arctic Working Group (2013-2016), and now The Nordic Thematic Group on sustainable rural development (2018-2021).

Anna loves food and has written about changes in agriculture of the North and Fisheries towards a new regime that builds on rediscovering and reinventing traditions combined with innovations and in some cases combining primary production activities with tourism development. The coastal and inland areas of Arctic Norden are under transition. Food tourism in peripheral regions differs from more central locations in the sense that tourism demand and tourism

industry support for northern cuisine is relatively new. In the Arctic as in other peripheral regions, there is a trend in the tourism industry to provide local experiences through food for visitors to Arctic regions.

Transition entails for many of or the rural areas that they will to large extent still be based on food production such as livestock farming, fishing, aquaculture and other means of making a living from harvesting and producing, processing and presenting edible products combined with emerging service economies and creative industries. Sustainable living in the North in years to come will be based on innovations and a spirit to extract more ecologically sound products, New ways of developing the bio-economy of the North.

Anna has been member of slowfood since 2006 as an activist and in Terra-Madre events in Iceland. Her hobbies at home include permaculture gardening and culturing edible flowers and vegetables.

  Boris Schiøler,  former "rock god" of the polka-punk orchestra Düreforsög, lives in Samsø, an island in the middle of Denmark. Since 2011 he has run a project together with the University of Olhao (Portugal) and the Danish University of Agriculture, in order to breed Edulis-Oysters in floating boxes on water. The goal is to protect the environment and to encourage the local society to nurture the oysters. At ArktiskMat he will talk about how, with very little resources, you can build your own oyster farm. And of course, he will also play polka-punk.

Boris Schiøler, former "rock god" of the polka-punk orchestra Düreforsög, lives in Samsø, an island in the middle of Denmark. Since 2011 he has run a project together with the University of Olhao (Portugal) and the Danish University of Agriculture, in order to breed Edulis-Oysters in floating boxes on water. The goal is to protect the environment and to encourage the local society to nurture the oysters. At ArktiskMat he will talk about how, with very little resources, you can build your own oyster farm. And of course, he will also play polka-punk.

  Nathan Outlaw . Originally, from Kent, Nathan now calls Cornwall home and is a proud ambassador of all things Cornish. Having attending Thanet College in Broadstairs, his love for seafood cookery ignited when he came to Cornwall as a young chef to work with Rick Stein. Nathan has two restaurants and a pub in Cornwall, Restaurant Nathan Outlaw and Outlaw’s Fish Kitchen in Port Isaac and The Mariners public house in Rock. Further afield are Outlaw’s at The Capital Hotel, Knightsbridge and his first venue outside the UK, ‘Nathan Outlaw at Al Mahara’, in the world famous Burj Al Arab Jumeirah in Dubai.  Nathan’s interest in education and training saw him join forces with Cornwall College to open Academy Nathan Outlaw where enhanced learning opportunities are offered to young Chefs and Front of House. He is also in demand at industry conferences where his expertise is valued by those training and by experienced chefs. Nathan has written several successful cookery books, all except one focussing on seafood cookery.  His easy manner, enthusiasm and obvious passion for his work make him a hit with audiences of all ages at food festivals and he regularly appears on TV programmes like ‘Saturday Kitchen’ and ‘Masterchef Professionals’.

Nathan Outlaw. Originally, from Kent, Nathan now calls Cornwall home and is a proud ambassador of all things Cornish. Having attending Thanet College in Broadstairs, his love for seafood cookery ignited when he came to Cornwall as a young chef to work with Rick Stein. Nathan has two restaurants and a pub in Cornwall, Restaurant Nathan Outlaw and Outlaw’s Fish Kitchen in Port Isaac and The Mariners public house in Rock. Further afield are Outlaw’s at The Capital Hotel, Knightsbridge and his first venue outside the UK, ‘Nathan Outlaw at Al Mahara’, in the world famous Burj Al Arab Jumeirah in Dubai.

Nathan’s interest in education and training saw him join forces with Cornwall College to open Academy Nathan Outlaw where enhanced learning opportunities are offered to young Chefs and Front of House. He is also in demand at industry conferences where his expertise is valued by those training and by experienced chefs. Nathan has written several successful cookery books, all except one focussing on seafood cookery.

His easy manner, enthusiasm and obvious passion for his work make him a hit with audiences of all ages at food festivals and he regularly appears on TV programmes like ‘Saturday Kitchen’ and ‘Masterchef Professionals’.

    Pierre Koffmann  (born 21 August 1948) is a French-born professional chef who has worked mainly in the United Kingdom. He was one of a handful of chefs in the United Kingdom to have been awarded the coveted three Michelin stars at his restaurant La Tante Claire in London.  Pierre Koffmann has been at the centre of fine dining in Britain for over forty years. His restaurant, La Tante Claire in London, that opened in 1977 and closed in 2004 was awarded the maximum three-Michelin stars, making him one of only eight chefs in the United Kingdom to achieve such an accolade  La Tante Claire gained its third Michelin star within six years of opening, an extraordinary feat made possible by Hoffman’s approach to defining extraordinary dishes from classically simple ingredients. His kitchen also became the training ground for some of the world’s great chefs, including Tom Aikens, Gordon Ramsay, Marco Pierre White and Marcus Wareing.

Pierre Koffmann (born 21 August 1948) is a French-born professional chef who has worked mainly in the United Kingdom. He was one of a handful of chefs in the United Kingdom to have been awarded the coveted three Michelin stars at his restaurant La Tante Claire in London.

Pierre Koffmann has been at the centre of fine dining in Britain for over forty years. His restaurant, La Tante Claire in London, that opened in 1977 and closed in 2004 was awarded the maximum three-Michelin stars, making him one of only eight chefs in the United Kingdom to achieve such an accolade

La Tante Claire gained its third Michelin star within six years of opening, an extraordinary feat made possible by Hoffman’s approach to defining extraordinary dishes from classically simple ingredients. His kitchen also became the training ground for some of the world’s great chefs, including Tom Aikens, Gordon Ramsay, Marco Pierre White and Marcus Wareing.

  Christopher Sjuve  is a Norwegian chef, writer and programmer who communicates knowledge about food. He is the former editor of Norway's largest food page, klikk.no, where he was working to guide people through the daily basics: "How to make dinner in ten minutes", "The World's Best Chocolate Cake" and "Just like that, Cauliflower becomes good."  Christopher has distinguished himself as a foodwriter in serveral national newspapers and broadcasters in Norway, currently in Dagbladet. In 2006 he was named "food intermediary of the year".

Christopher Sjuve is a Norwegian chef, writer and programmer who communicates knowledge about food. He is the former editor of Norway's largest food page, klikk.no, where he was working to guide people through the daily basics: "How to make dinner in ten minutes", "The World's Best Chocolate Cake" and "Just like that, Cauliflower becomes good."

Christopher has distinguished himself as a foodwriter in serveral national newspapers and broadcasters in Norway, currently in Dagbladet. In 2006 he was named "food intermediary of the year".

  Mark Emil Hermansen  Mark Emil is the co-founder of Empirical Spirits, a freeform spirits company based in Copenhagen. He is trained as an anthropologist, studying the notion of “terroir” at Oxford University, before joining restaurant noma and the MAD Symposium, where he worked simultaneously for 5 years. Mark Emil was alsp a Global Shaper under the World Economic Forum Global Shapers Community for young, promising leaders under the age of 30.

Mark Emil Hermansen Mark Emil is the co-founder of Empirical Spirits, a freeform spirits company based in Copenhagen. He is trained as an anthropologist, studying the notion of “terroir” at Oxford University, before joining restaurant noma and the MAD Symposium, where he worked simultaneously for 5 years. Mark Emil was alsp a Global Shaper under the World Economic Forum Global Shapers Community for young, promising leaders under the age of 30.

  Melina Shannon-DiPietro  is Executive Director of MAD, the non-profit organization founded by René Redzepi of restaurant noma. MAD inspires and assists chefs, servers, and the food community to make a real and sustainable difference in restaurants, communities, and the world at large. Melina has been building programs, public dialogue, and partnerships that transform our understanding of food, community, and environment for fifteen years. Prior to MAD, she was Director of Food & Revenue Strategies for Friends of the High Line, the organization that changed an abandoned elevated rail line into one of New York City's best-loved public parks. Melina began her career as co-founder of the Yale Sustainable Food Program. Originally from Albany, New York, Melina now calls wonderful Copenhagen, Denmark, her home.

Melina Shannon-DiPietro is Executive Director of MAD, the non-profit organization founded by René Redzepi of restaurant noma. MAD inspires and assists chefs, servers, and the food community to make a real and sustainable difference in restaurants, communities, and the world at large. Melina has been building programs, public dialogue, and partnerships that transform our understanding of food, community, and environment for fifteen years. Prior to MAD, she was Director of Food & Revenue Strategies for Friends of the High Line, the organization that changed an abandoned elevated rail line into one of New York City's best-loved public parks. Melina began her career as co-founder of the Yale Sustainable Food Program. Originally from Albany, New York, Melina now calls wonderful Copenhagen, Denmark, her home.

  Henrietta Lovell  is known around the world as Rare Tea Lady. She is the founder to the global, award-winning, global brand Rare Tea Co.  Lovell left a career in corporate finance to found Rare Tea Company in 2004.  She is at the forefront of the tea revolution - replacing industrial grade bags and flavourings with the highest quality leaves. She works with chefs and sommeliers to pair flavours and creates bespoke blends for some of the best restaurants in the world including A lain Ducasse, Noma  in Copenhagen,  11 Madison Park in New York  and  Claridge’s  in the UK.  Henrietta travels the world working directly with small independent tea gardens from the Shire Highlands of Malawi to the foothills of the Himalayas. By sourcing direct from the farms she is able to secure unique harvests and ensure that they are crafted using sustainable practices to benefit both the land and the people who live on it.  As an advocate for flavour Henrietta is ceaselessly adventuring and collaborating.

Henrietta Lovell is known around the world as Rare Tea Lady. She is the founder to the global, award-winning, global brand Rare Tea Co.

Lovell left a career in corporate finance to found Rare Tea Company in 2004.

She is at the forefront of the tea revolution - replacing industrial grade bags and flavourings with the highest quality leaves. She works with chefs and sommeliers to pair flavours and creates bespoke blends for some of the best restaurants in the world including Alain Ducasse, Noma in Copenhagen, 11 Madison Park in New York and Claridge’s in the UK.

Henrietta travels the world working directly with small independent tea gardens from the Shire Highlands of Malawi to the foothills of the Himalayas. By sourcing direct from the farms she is able to secure unique harvests and ensure that they are crafted using sustainable practices to benefit both the land and the people who live on it.

As an advocate for flavour Henrietta is ceaselessly adventuring and collaborating.

 Associate Prof.Dr. Pelin Tan  is a sociologist and art historian focused on artistic and architectural pedagogy, design methodologies in territorial conflict and commoning practices. Currently, she is visiting associate professor at the Architecture Faculty, University of Cyprus, Nicosia.  She worked as the vice-dean at the Architecture Faculty of Mardin Artuklu University between 2013 - 2017. She was a Visiting Research Assoc. Prof. of Design Strategies at Hong Kong Polytechnic University, School of Design (2016), Postdoctoral fellow at the School of Architecture and Planning, ACT Program, MIT (2011), Research fellow of Japan Foundation - Osaka Urban Research Plaza (2012), DAAD at Art History, Humboldt Univ. (2007). Tan is at the board of the pedagogical consortium on Refugee Heritage, Campus in Camps, Dheisheh Palestinian Refugee Camp. Tan was a fellow of BAK - basis for actual knowledge - Utrecht (2017 - 2018). She is a lead author of ‘Towards an Urban Society’, the International Panel on Social Progress (Edit.S.Sassen&E.Pieterse, Cambridge Publ. 2018). 2000+: Urgencies of Architectural Theories (GSAPP, 2015), The Silent University: Toward Transversal Pedagogy (Sternberg Press, 2016). Tan participated in Oslo Architecture Triennial in 2016, Istanbul Biennial in 2007 and 2015, Lisbon Architecture Biennial, Montreal Biennial. Tan the artistic curator of GardenUtopia grassroots communities project of Matera ECC 2019, Italy. Prof. Tan will be in research resident at Lofoten Art&Film Academy ( Nordland kunst- og filmfagskole) at Kabalveg in 2019.

Associate Prof.Dr.Pelin Tan is a sociologist and art historian focused on artistic and architectural pedagogy, design methodologies in territorial conflict and commoning practices. Currently, she is visiting associate professor at the Architecture Faculty, University of Cyprus, Nicosia.

She worked as the vice-dean at the Architecture Faculty of Mardin Artuklu University between 2013 - 2017. She was a Visiting Research Assoc. Prof. of Design Strategies at Hong Kong Polytechnic University, School of Design (2016), Postdoctoral fellow at the School of Architecture and Planning, ACT Program, MIT (2011), Research fellow of Japan Foundation - Osaka Urban Research Plaza (2012), DAAD at Art History, Humboldt Univ. (2007). Tan is at the board of the pedagogical consortium on Refugee Heritage, Campus in Camps, Dheisheh Palestinian Refugee Camp. Tan was a fellow of BAK - basis for actual knowledge - Utrecht (2017 - 2018). She is a lead author of ‘Towards an Urban Society’, the International Panel on Social Progress (Edit.S.Sassen&E.Pieterse, Cambridge Publ. 2018). 2000+: Urgencies of Architectural Theories (GSAPP, 2015), The Silent University: Toward Transversal Pedagogy (Sternberg Press, 2016). Tan participated in Oslo Architecture Triennial in 2016, Istanbul Biennial in 2007 and 2015, Lisbon Architecture Biennial, Montreal Biennial. Tan the artistic curator of GardenUtopia grassroots communities project of Matera ECC 2019, Italy. Prof. Tan will be in research resident at Lofoten Art&Film Academy ( Nordland kunst- og filmfagskole) at Kabalveg in 2019.

  Saori Ichihara , head chef and owner of newly opened restaurant Ichi in Stockholm. Born and raised in Osaka, Japan. Moved to Sweden in 2014 and have worked at renowned restaurants, such as Esperanto (*) and Oaxen Krog (**). She was awarded a bronze medal In “chef of the year” 2015 and recently won the “Stella awards” as female chef of the year.  At ArktiskMat, Saori and her team will be responsible for one of the main dinners

Saori Ichihara, head chef and owner of newly opened restaurant Ichi in Stockholm. Born and raised in Osaka, Japan. Moved to Sweden in 2014 and have worked at renowned restaurants, such as Esperanto (*) and Oaxen Krog (**). She was awarded a bronze medal In “chef of the year” 2015 and recently won the “Stella awards” as female chef of the year.

At ArktiskMat, Saori and her team will be responsible for one of the main dinners

  Esben Holmboe Bang  is head chef and co-owner of Norway’s ground-breaking three Michelinstarred Restaurant Maaemo. He was born and raised in Copenhagen, but has spent most of his culinary career in Oslo. The Norwegian terroir is a relatively unknown treasure of the international culinary world, but it is something that Esben is passionate about exploring. Esben’s cuisine is focused on creating an experience around the clean, bright flavors of Norway, using entirely organic, biodynamic, or wild produce. "We opened Maaemo to have something that we felt was the right way to let Norwegian nature shine through on the plate,” explains Esben.  It’s a bold style of cooking that has won the young chef a legion of fans and a listing as one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential Chefs in the World and Elite Traveler Magazine’s ‘2016 Young Chef of the Year.’  In 2012, just 14 months after opening, Maaemo was awarded two Michelin stars in its first ever mention in the prestigious guide, becoming the first, and only, restaurant in the Nordics to do so. In 2016, Maaemo was awarded a third Michelin star, making Esben the youngest chef to currently hold Michelin’s highest accolade and the first ever in Norway to do so. Maaemo was also listed No.79 in the top 100 restaurants in the world at the 2017 World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards, and No.29 in the top 100 restaurants in the world by the influential Elite Traveler magazine.

Esben Holmboe Bang is head chef and co-owner of Norway’s ground-breaking three Michelinstarred Restaurant Maaemo. He was born and raised in Copenhagen, but has spent most of his culinary career in Oslo. The Norwegian terroir is a relatively unknown treasure of the international culinary world, but it is something that Esben is passionate about exploring. Esben’s cuisine is focused on creating an experience around the clean, bright flavors of Norway, using entirely organic, biodynamic, or wild produce. "We opened Maaemo to have something that we felt was the right way to let Norwegian nature shine through on the plate,” explains Esben.

It’s a bold style of cooking that has won the young chef a legion of fans and a listing as one of Time Magazine’s 100 Most Influential Chefs in the World and Elite Traveler Magazine’s ‘2016 Young Chef of the Year.’

In 2012, just 14 months after opening, Maaemo was awarded two Michelin stars in its first ever mention in the prestigious guide, becoming the first, and only, restaurant in the Nordics to do so. In 2016, Maaemo was awarded a third Michelin star, making Esben the youngest chef to currently hold Michelin’s highest accolade and the first ever in Norway to do so. Maaemo was also listed No.79 in the top 100 restaurants in the world at the 2017 World’s 50 Best Restaurants awards, and No.29 in the top 100 restaurants in the world by the influential Elite Traveler magazine.

  Henry DeBey  is a fishery officer with the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, or FAO. He currently works on the Blue Growth Initiative, FAO's approach to sustainable fisheries and aquaculture development within the blue economy. Previously he worked for The Pew Charitable Trusts and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on fisheries management. Henry has a masters degree in environmental science from Yale University and a bachelors degree in geography from the University of California Los Angeles.

Henry DeBey is a fishery officer with the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, or FAO. He currently works on the Blue Growth Initiative, FAO's approach to sustainable fisheries and aquaculture development within the blue economy. Previously he worked for The Pew Charitable Trusts and the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration on fisheries management. Henry has a masters degree in environmental science from Yale University and a bachelors degree in geography from the University of California Los Angeles.

  Arlene Stein  is the founder and Executive Director of the Terroir Symposium, a catalyst for creative collaboration and social and environmental responsibility in the hospitality industry. Since 2006, Terroir has convened international and Canadian industry leaders annually at a two-day symposium in Toronto—and since 2014 at off-shoot events across Europe and North America—for education, networking and inspiration. From her current home base in Berlin, Arlene travels globally to research responsible food systems and gastronomic innovations. Arlene has a strong knowledge around aquaculture in Canada.

Arlene Stein is the founder and Executive Director of the Terroir Symposium, a catalyst for creative collaboration and social and environmental responsibility in the hospitality industry. Since 2006, Terroir has convened international and Canadian industry leaders annually at a two-day symposium in Toronto—and since 2014 at off-shoot events across Europe and North America—for education, networking and inspiration. From her current home base in Berlin, Arlene travels globally to research responsible food systems and gastronomic innovations. Arlene has a strong knowledge around aquaculture in Canada.

    Paul Cunningham  cooking everyday from Denmark's wild west coast at Henne Kirkeby Kro. Chef & Wanderer, proud author & photographer. Born in Essex, England 1969. Schooled and trained as chef at various British restaurants and country house hotels. Then he met Lene, a beautiful Danish girl, and moved with her to Korsør, Denmark in 1994. Worked at Søllerød Kro, Formel B, Coquus, co-owner of The Paul - Tivoli Garden in Copenhagen - and since 2012 head chef at Henne Kirkeby Kro.  Got a star in Michelin Guide Rouge in 2003-2011 at The Paul, and a star in 2016 and two stars in 2017 at Henne Kirkeby Kro.

Paul Cunningham cooking everyday from Denmark's wild west coast at Henne Kirkeby Kro. Chef & Wanderer, proud author & photographer. Born in Essex, England 1969. Schooled and trained as chef at various British restaurants and country house hotels. Then he met Lene, a beautiful Danish girl, and moved with her to Korsør, Denmark in 1994. Worked at Søllerød Kro, Formel B, Coquus, co-owner of The Paul - Tivoli Garden in Copenhagen - and since 2012 head chef at Henne Kirkeby Kro.

Got a star in Michelin Guide Rouge in 2003-2011 at The Paul, and a star in 2016 and two stars in 2017 at Henne Kirkeby Kro.